Atlanta Section
IEEE
AESS/GRSS Chapter

The Atlanta Section joint Chapter of the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems and Geoscience and Remote Sensing Societies serves remote sensing professionals in the Atlanta area through periodic meetings with technical presentations.

Previous Meetings:

Title:           Through-Wall Microwave Imaging: Some Applications of Physics to Urban Reconnaissance [slides]
Speaker:     Dr. Peter Weichman

Date:           September 17, 2014
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

This talk will review some recent physics-based modeling approaches in support of microwave through-wall building tomography. Building layout estimation is a nonlinear inverse problem with a large number of degrees of freedom (geometry, location, and scattering properties of major building elements, such as walls, floors, and ceilings, plus many other smaller elements such as windows, doorways, and stairways). The physics of microwave propagation in such environments is very complex, involving multiple reflection, transmission, and diffraction events. Careful control of measurement protocol, using well-focused and directed transmitter and receiver arrays, can mitigate this to some degree. However, even under the most optimistic scenarios, the number of interactions increases exponentially as the signal penetrates more deeply into the building. Multiple overlapping returns from different building elements quickly overwhelm one’s ability to disambiguate their sources. To explore the fundamental limitations on solutions to the inverse problem, efforts to create physics-based models that capture the signal complexity as accurately as possible will be described. These models remain an approximate description of reality, but nevertheless enable one to understand the effects of the explosion of multiple scattering events on the inversion, and quantify the limits of the inversion quality under even the most optimistic scenarios for data diversity and precision.

Biography:

Dr. Peter Weichman is a principal scientist at BAE Systems, Advanced Information Technologies with research experience in a broad range of fields, including electromagnetic scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance, fluid dynamics and turbulence, oceanography and ocean acoustics, low temperature physics, condensed matter physics, and phase transitions and critical phenomena. Specific topics include: (i) development of fundamentally new physics-based algorithms for landmine and unexploded ordnance (UXO) detection and discrimination using time- and frequency-domain EM methods; (ii) development of acoustic holography imaging approaches to detection of buried underwater UXO; (iii) development of a rigorous theory of surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) for imaging of subsurface water content; (iv) development of advanced physics-based approaches to radar imaging in high multipath environments; (v) development of new methods for predicting ocean, planetary atmosphere, and plasma circulation patterns using ideas from equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics; (vi) development of a general theory of transport of bio- and geo-chemical quantities by ocean internal wave fields; (vii) development of a comprehensive theory of Doppler shift corrections for ocean acoustics; (viii) development of a new multicomponent fluid approach to the Kolmogorov cascade in fluid turbulence; (ix) development of renormalization group theories of the superfluid transition in He-4 adsorbed in porous media; (x) applications of renormalization group theories to phase transitions in thin rare gas films; (xi) studies of quantum phase transitions in superfluid, superconducting and quantum spin glass systems; (xii) studies of superfluid-normal interface and self-organized critical states in superfluid He-4 under the presence of a uniform heat current.


Title:           Electronic Warfare in Defensive Counter Air Operations
Speaker:     Thomas Wallace

Date:           August 8, 2014
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

Defensive Counter Air (DCA) is a primary mission set designed to protect US interests and centers of gravity from attack through threats originating from the air. Defense of critical areas is a mission that requires continuous coverage and surveillance to ensure US interests are protected from attack and any threat is quickly neutralized. DCA missions rely on an integrated air defense plan using both airborne and ground based air defense systems. Primary air systems involved in DCA missions are airborne air to air fighters; primarily F-22, F-15C with F-16, F-18 and F-15E supporting air to air engagements. E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) provide Command and Control (C2) to airborne fighters, conduct tanker and lane battle management, and provide surveillance and early warning to a possible attack by adversary forces. During DCA operations, enemy electronic attack (EA) will be focused on denying and deceiving US C2ISR platforms, as well as denying targeting and deceiving both air to air fighters and ground based air defense systems. The goal of enemy EA during a DCA mission will to avoid detection, provide enough EA to confuse operators, deceive operators, and finally to prevent engagement from US systems. The goal of this presentation is to introduce the audience to air operations from a defensive counter air and missile mind set to include an overview of the air and ground based equipment ranging from air to air fighters through command and control of tactical forces. Then the difficulties encountered in a contested RF environment will be examined and how the fielded forces must utilize each unique sensor to coordinate a single integrated air picture to ensure the survivability of the assets protected.

Biography:

Tom “TD” Wallace is a Senior Research Associate at Georgia Tech Research Institute. He received a Master of Arts in Operational Warfare from Air University, Maxwell, Alabama in 2012. He retired from the United States Air Force in December, 2013 serving in various assignments, culminating as the Director of Operations for Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) operational testing as part of the Joint Test Force with Boeing in Seattle, WA. He also worked as the Senior Air Defense Advisor to the Iraqi Air Defense Command in Baghdad, Iraq following the completion of US operations in Iraq in 2011. TD is a rated Senior Air Battle Manager with over 1,500 hours in E-3 B/C aircraft as well as E-3G experimental aircraft and was a 2007 graduate of the US Air Force Weapons School.


Title:           Non-Linear Compensation for High Performance Feedback Systems with Actuator Imperfections
Speaker:     Prof. John O’Brien

Date:           June 16, 2014
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

Inexpensive actuators are often more rugged than costly alternatives, a particularly attractive feature for military applications or operations in harsh environments. A common drawback of inexpensive actuation is variability in response that contributes to tracking error. This can be ameliorated without substantial expense by the application of large feedback that not only enhances tracking performance and rejects disturbances, but also reduces the sensitivity to parameter variations of systems in the forward path. However, component imperfections in the inexpensive actuator often result in behaviors more parlous than a slow shift in frequency response modulus for which feedback easily compensates in the form of multiple, uncertain nonlinearities. While standard mild-feedback systems are intrinsically robust to such nonlinearities, the stability of large feedback systems is threatened by such characteristics. This eliminates from consideration the usage of imperfect actuators in linear, large feedback applications. The implementation of multiple-path nonlinear dynamic compensation, however, allows this combination. Such a strategy is the focus of this discussion. The features of the staged loop recovery system with reduction compensation in the quiescent condition are compared to those of an alternative approach of strict modulus reduction via nonlinear compensation for stability retention. The superiority of the loop recovery system is illustrated using closed-loop data taken during experiments on a parallel kinematic machine using inexpensive actuation.

Biography:

John O’Brien is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Wyoming. He received the PhD in Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2001. He was a Member of Technical Staff at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory from 1991-1997 where he researched control-structure interaction. He was a senior lead engineer at General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems from 2001-2003 where he developed control technologies for application to missile defense. His current research interests are in the areas of high performance control on imperfect mechanical systems and compliant robot actuator control.


Title:           Cyber-Physical Systems at Small and Large Scales [slides]
Speaker:     Prof. Marilyn Wolf

Date:           April 23, 2014
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

Cyber-physical systems have received a great deal of attention in recent years, but decades after we began to use computers to control physical systems. We will start with a few remarks on the definition of cyber-physical system and challenges in the field. We will then go on to describe two research projects on CPS at very different levels of physical granularity.

At the small end of the scale, we explored the relationship between schedulability and stability in control systems in collaboration with Prof. Fumin Zhang’s group. Both control theory and real-time systems theory traditionally view the sample period as involate. However, most real-time scheduling algorithms do introduce jitter in the execution interval of tasks. Until recently, the relationship between the schedulability of tasks and the stability of the control system had not been explored. We used Lyapunov analysis to show that, for a class of simple control systems running under rate-monotonic analysis, the goals of stability and schedulability are, in fact, consistent.

At the large end of the scale, my student Umer Tariq and I are collaborating with Prof. Santiago Grijalva’s group on distributed system architectures for smart energy grids based on the prosumer model. We have developed a multi-layer architecture for distributed control of smart energy systems based on a Web services model. At the RTOS layer, we use an API translator to map generic software onto target RTOSs. At the Web level, we have developed a model for hard real-time Web services.

Biography:

Marilyn Wolf is Farmer Distinguished Chair and Georgia Research Alliance Eminient Scholar at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She received her BS, MS, and PhD in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1980, 1981, and 1984, respectively. She was with AT&T Bell Laboratories from 1984 to 1989. She was on the faculty of Princeton University from 1989 to 2007. Her research interests included embedded computing, embedded video and computer vision, and VLSI systems. She has received the ASEE Terman Award and IEEE Circuits and Systems Society Education Award. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and ACM and an IEEE Computer Society Golden Core member.


Title:           Bayesian Inference with Neural Circuits
Speaker:     Dr. Samuel Shapero

Date:           Feb 19, 2014
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

The universe does not always send us information in the most useful format: consider the case where you are in a crowded lecture hall, patiently watching the instructor and taking notes, when a wadded-up ball of paper hits you in the back of the head. You have one key piece of information, the angle with which the ball hit you. But what you really want to know is who threw the ball.

Fortunately, our brains have evolved over millions of years to solve problems very similar to this one. Many recent studies suggest that the mammalian brain is highly adept at performing Bayesian inference; that is, the brain is very good at making sense of an observation by using Bayes' theorem of conditional probability.

Nonlinear Bayesian inference problems show up in a wide range of signal processing applications, like radar and medical imaging. Using neurally inspired architectures, we can greatly improve both the speed and power efficiency relative to software solutions. In this talk, I’ll survey the field of neuromorphic hardware, and my doctoral research in the subject, and go over the path forward to a real time MRI.

Biography:

Dr. Samuel Shapero is a research engineer specializing in electronic warfare at the Georgia Tech Research Institute. Dr. Shapero received a PhD in Bioengineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013. His dissertation focused on high speed hardware solutions for identifying sparse patterns in noisy environments. While at Georgia Tech, Dr. Shapero was a Presidential Fellow (2008-2012) and a NSF IGERT Fellow (2008-2010). Dr. Shapero has numerous publications and patents in the fields of signal processing, error correction, and hardware design. Dr. Shapero has been a member of the IEEE since 2008, and an Old Crow since 2013.


Title:           GAUSS UAV and Payload
Speaker:     Mike Brinkmann

Date:           August 29, 2013
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Biography:

Mike Brinkmann is a Principal Research Engineer with the Georgia Tech Research Institute and Division Chief of the Sensor Systems Engineering Division. He has a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Florida and a M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been involved with the design and development of radars and radar signal processing systems for over 25 years at GTRI. His areas of interest include signal processing architectures and high-speed digital systems. He is currently running the GAUSS project at GTRI.


Title:           Radar Electronic Protection [slides]
Speaker:     Dave Adamy

Date:           May 21, 2013
Time:          10:30 AM - 2:30 PM
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

This course covers Radar Electronic Protection techniques used in modern threats (unclassified) focusing on their impact upon the way we intercept and jam threat radars. It starts with a discussion of the one-way communication link (including how to use the slide rule, which will be provided) and then reviews important jamming techniques. Finally, it covers the important Electronic Protection techniques. Because of classification, the techniques will be discussed technically - not related to specific threat radars except as discussed in open literature. Handouts will include an Antenna and Propagation slide rule (with some scales not found on any of the slide rules you have probably seen), handout of class material, and an EW Pocket Guide written by Adamy, which includes handy formulas and charts.

Biography:

Dave Adamy, has spent decades as systems engineer and technical manager in the EW field, and is an acknowledged expert in communications band EW. He is currently providing consulting support to the development and presentation of counter IED techniques and operator courses. He has published over 150 technical articles related to EW, including the popular EW101 column in the Journal of Electronic Defense, and has 10 books in print. He teaches EW related courses for Military, Government and Industry organizations in the US and in allied countries.


Title:           Aviation: The Next 100 Years
Speaker:     Bruce McKay

Date:           March 27, 2013
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

The talk reviews the technology and aircraft changes over the first 100 years of aviation and examines technology and air vehicle concepts that could be realized over the next 100 years.

Biography:

Bruce McKay has 33 years of aircraft design and integration experience across three major aerospace companies and has held numerous design lead positions supporting several aircraft and engine programs. Currently supporting the C-5M program, he has recently supported the Advanced Mobility Aircraft System Design team and was the Chief Engineer on the NASA ERA project at the Skunk Works. He holds an MBA from the U of Cincinnati, a BSAE from Northrop University and a Diploma of Aerospace Technology from Ryerson University.


Title:           Segmentation in Mobile Image and Video Analysis
Speaker:     Dana Forsthoefel

Date:           February 20, 2013
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

Many vision applications apply image-segmentation techniques during preprocessing to reduce image information for increased processing efficiency. Often these applications are mobile, requiring segmentation procedures to be both accurate and efficient in their implementation. This presentation will discuss the challenge of image segmentation in the field of mobile computer vision and propose efficient segmentation techniques to advance this field. The goal of this research is to provide vision applications with faster, more accurate segmentation techniques for both single- and multiple-frame scene analysis that are efficient enough to be used on embedded and mobile platforms.

Biography:

Dana Forsthoefel received the BS degree (with highest honor) in computer engineering and the MS degree in electrical and computer engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2008 and 2009, respectively. In 2013, she anticipates completing her PhD requirements in the same field. She was awarded the Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship as support for her continued graduate studies in computing and technology. Since 2012, she has worked as a research assistant with the Georgia Tech Research Institute’s Sensors and Electromagnetic Applications Lab. Her primary research interests include embedded computer vision and fast, resource-efficient, automated image processing. She is a member of IEEE and HKN.


Archive of Earlier Meetings


  • Chapter Chair: Kristin Bing
  • AESS Program Chair: Timothy Brothers
  • GRSS Program Chair: Gary Gimmestad
  • Treasurer: Ryan Bales
  • Secretary: Craig Schlottmann
  • Website Coordinator: Peter Tuuk
  • Local Arrangements: Juan Santamaria, Ernesto Potdevin, Amy Sharma, Margaret Garvan, Jenny Reed, Dana Forsthoeffel, Timothy Brothers, Jim Skala, Kellie McConnell, Joshua Hamilton, Melanie Hill, Daniel Smith
  • Student Liaison: Breneman Whitfield

  • GIT maintains an e-mail list server for distributing information about the Atlanta Section of IEEE AESS/GRSS in a timely manner. By subscribing to the email list you will receive meeting announcements and other information as soon as it is disseminated. While some of this material is available from this web site as well, the list server automatically sends new information to you without requiring that you access this page.

    To subscribe to the list server email Peter Tuuk.


    Call for Volunteers

    The chapter officers are interested in hearing from anyone who would like to volunteer their time as an officer, help out arranging meetings, suggest technical speakers or make a technical presentation.
     

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