Atlanta Section
IEEE
AESS/GRSS Chapter

The Atlanta Section joint Chapter of the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems and Geoscience and Remote Sensing Societies serves remote sensing professionals in the Atlanta area through periodic meetings with technical presentations.

Previous Meetings:

Title:           Robotics in Infrastructure: Roadbot Development [slides]
Speaker:     Mr. Jonathan Holmes

Date:           June 26, 2015
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

It is no secret that our aging, and failing, infrastructure of roads, bridges, lines, and pipes looms as an impending national crisis. During the 2014-2015 winter it seemed as if there was a daily newsworthy water main break or car-eating pothole. The projected annual cost to sustain the nation's existing roads and bridges alone exceeds $91.1 billion. If you include aging energy, water, and communication infrastructure, by 2020, the cost will be more than $3.6 trillion.

A new class of intelligent tools that can augment the productivity of the workforce to address these challenges is emerging. Examples include tools that could enable more frequent, precise, and consistent bridge inspection and painting; tools for power line evaluation and maintenance that can make these activities not only more frequent but also safer; tools for more efficiently identifying and removing potential debris hazards along roadways; and tools for more efficient inspection and maintenance of reservoir facilities.

Amazing advances in the capabilities of robots in mining, construction, and agriculture have occurred. However, the ability of robots to interact with their surroundings is still mainly limited to spatial navigation and controlled manipulation. Enabling this new class of intelligent robotic tools which can interact with their surroundings could transform the way we repair, inspect, and maintain infrastructure.

Biography:

Mr. Jonathan Holmes joined GTRI as a Research Engineer I in 2005 after working for over three years at Harris Corporation in Melbourne, FL. He was promoted to Research Engineer II in 2009 while working on his master's degree in mechanical engineering, which was awarded in 2012. Mr. Holmes has continued his education through his pursuit of a PhD in mechanical engineering, expected in 2017, with a focus on additive manufacturing methods. He has passed his PhD qualifiers and continues his studies as a PhD student. Mr. Holmes has leveraged his education to reinforce his primary technical areas of expertise in electro-mechanical packaging, cost estimation methods, systems engineering, and thermal analysis. He has demonstrated his mastery in these areas through a master's degree thesis, four patents, 13 patent disclosures, authoring a book chapter, 4 journal articles, 4 refereed conference papers, seven non-refereed publications and 34 technical reports. He has also demonstrated his mastery of these areas through technical presentations to such agencies as DARPA, the US Navy, Air Force, Army, Marines, and the Georgia Department of Transportation.


Title:           Multi-Sensor Fusion, Counter-Examples to Traditional Thought [slides]
Speaker:     Dr. W. Dale Blair

Date:           April 15, 2015
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Biography:

Dr. Blair received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, in 1985 and 1987, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 1998.

From 1987 to 1990, he was with the Naval System Division of FMC Corporation in Dahlgren, VA. From 1990 to 1997, he was with the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) in Dahlgren, VA, where he directed a real-time experiment that demonstrated that modern tracking algorithms can be used to improve the efficiency of phased array radars. He developed NSWC Tracking Benchmarks I and II and originated ONR/NSWC Tracking Benchmarks III and IV. He joined the Georgia Institute of Technology as a senior research engineer in 1997 and was promoted to principal research engineer in 2000. His research interests include radar signal processing and control, resource allocation for multifunction radars, multisensor resource allocation, tracking maneuvering targets, and multisensor integration and data fusion.

Dr. Blair is coeditor of Multitarget-Multisensor Tracking: Applications and Advances III. He has coauthored 22 refereed journal articles, 16 refereed conference papers, 67 papers and reports, and two book chapters. He is the developer and coordinator of the short course Target Tracking in Sensor Systems for the Distance Learning and Professional Education Department at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received the 2001 IEEE Young Radar Engineer of the Year, appointments of Editor for Radar Systems, Editor-In-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems (AES), and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal for Advances in Information Fusion, and election to the Board of Governors of the IEEE AES Society, 1998-2003, 2005-2007, and Board of Directors of the International Society of Information Fusion.


Title:           Through-Wall Microwave Imaging: Some Applications of Physics to Urban Reconnaissance [slides]
Speaker:     Dr. Peter Weichman

Date:           September 17, 2014
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

This talk will review some recent physics-based modeling approaches in support of microwave through-wall building tomography. Building layout estimation is a nonlinear inverse problem with a large number of degrees of freedom (geometry, location, and scattering properties of major building elements, such as walls, floors, and ceilings, plus many other smaller elements such as windows, doorways, and stairways). The physics of microwave propagation in such environments is very complex, involving multiple reflection, transmission, and diffraction events. Careful control of measurement protocol, using well-focused and directed transmitter and receiver arrays, can mitigate this to some degree. However, even under the most optimistic scenarios, the number of interactions increases exponentially as the signal penetrates more deeply into the building. Multiple overlapping returns from different building elements quickly overwhelm one's ability to disambiguate their sources. To explore the fundamental limitations on solutions to the inverse problem, efforts to create physics-based models that capture the signal complexity as accurately as possible will be described. These models remain an approximate description of reality, but nevertheless enable one to understand the effects of the explosion of multiple scattering events on the inversion, and quantify the limits of the inversion quality under even the most optimistic scenarios for data diversity and precision.

Biography:

Dr. Peter Weichman is a principal scientist at BAE Systems, Advanced Information Technologies with research experience in a broad range of fields, including electromagnetic scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance, fluid dynamics and turbulence, oceanography and ocean acoustics, low temperature physics, condensed matter physics, and phase transitions and critical phenomena. Specific topics include: (i) development of fundamentally new physics-based algorithms for landmine and unexploded ordnance (UXO) detection and discrimination using time- and frequency-domain EM methods; (ii) development of acoustic holography imaging approaches to detection of buried underwater UXO; (iii) development of a rigorous theory of surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) for imaging of subsurface water content; (iv) development of advanced physics-based approaches to radar imaging in high multipath environments; (v) development of new methods for predicting ocean, planetary atmosphere, and plasma circulation patterns using ideas from equilibrium and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics; (vi) development of a general theory of transport of bio- and geo-chemical quantities by ocean internal wave fields; (vii) development of a comprehensive theory of Doppler shift corrections for ocean acoustics; (viii) development of a new multicomponent fluid approach to the Kolmogorov cascade in fluid turbulence; (ix) development of renormalization group theories of the superfluid transition in He-4 adsorbed in porous media; (x) applications of renormalization group theories to phase transitions in thin rare gas films; (xi) studies of quantum phase transitions in superfluid, superconducting and quantum spin glass systems; (xii) studies of superfluid-normal interface and self-organized critical states in superfluid He-4 under the presence of a uniform heat current.


Title:           Electronic Warfare in Defensive Counter Air Operations
Speaker:     Thomas Wallace

Date:           August 8, 2014
Time:          12:00 PM (Refreshments at 11:30 AM)
Place:          GTRI CCRF Bldg 1 Room 107
(directions)

Abstract:

Defensive Counter Air (DCA) is a primary mission set designed to protect US interests and centers of gravity from attack through threats originating from the air. Defense of critical areas is a mission that requires continuous coverage and surveillance to ensure US interests are protected from attack and any threat is quickly neutralized. DCA missions rely on an integrated air defense plan using both airborne and ground based air defense systems. Primary air systems involved in DCA missions are airborne air to air fighters; primarily F-22, F-15C with F-16, F-18 and F-15E supporting air to air engagements. E-3 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) provide Command and Control (C2) to airborne fighters, conduct tanker and lane battle management, and provide surveillance and early warning to a possible attack by adversary forces. During DCA operations, enemy electronic attack (EA) will be focused on denying and deceiving US C2ISR platforms, as well as denying targeting and deceiving both air to air fighters and ground based air defense systems. The goal of enemy EA during a DCA mission will to avoid detection, provide enough EA to confuse operators, deceive operators, and finally to prevent engagement from US systems. The goal of this presentation is to introduce the audience to air operations from a defensive counter air and missile mind set to include an overview of the air and ground based equipment ranging from air to air fighters through command and control of tactical forces. Then the difficulties encountered in a contested RF environment will be examined and how the fielded forces must utilize each unique sensor to coordinate a single integrated air picture to ensure the survivability of the assets protected.

Biography:

Tom "TD" Wallace is a Senior Research Associate at Georgia Tech Research Institute. He received a Master of Arts in Operational Warfare from Air University, Maxwell, Alabama in 2012. He retired from the United States Air Force in December, 2013 serving in various assignments, culminating as the Director of Operations for Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) operational testing as part of the Joint Test Force with Boeing in Seattle, WA. He also worked as the Senior Air Defense Advisor to the Iraqi Air Defense Command in Baghdad, Iraq following the completion of US operations in Iraq in 2011. TD is a rated Senior Air Battle Manager with over 1,500 hours in E-3 B/C aircraft as well as E-3G experimental aircraft and was a 2007 graduate of the US Air Force Weapons School.


Archive of Earlier Meetings


  • Chapter Chair: Kristin Bing
  • AESS Program Chair: Melanie Hill
  • GRSS Program Chair: Allison Mercer
  • Treasurer: Ryan Bales
  • Secretary: Craig Schlottmann
  • Website Coordinator: Peter Tuuk
  • Local Arrangements: Juan Santamaria, Lance Schmieder, Margaret Garvan, Brian Mulvaney, Dana Forsthoeffel, Timothy Brothers, Jim Skala, Kellie McConnell, Joshua Hamilton, Daniel Smith
  • Student Liaison: Breneman Whitfield

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    Call for Volunteers

    The chapter officers are interested in hearing from anyone who would like to volunteer their time as an officer, help out arranging meetings, suggest technical speakers or make a technical presentation.
     

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